Popular AARP Hearing Highlights High Rx Prices



AARP’s Fair Rx Prices Now campaign fought for three reforms that could help older Americans pay for lifesaving drugs: allowing Medicare to negotiate lower prices with drugmakers; capping Part D disbursements; and imposing penalties on companies that raise drug prices above the rate of inflation.

“Not being able to afford the prescription drugs they need is a very real struggle for millions of Americans,” says Nancy LeaMond, AARP’s executive vice president and chief advocacy and engagement officer. “It is vitally important that decision makers hear these stories. American families need relief from soaring prescription drug prices, and they need it now.

The hearing included comments from AARP CEO Jo Ann Jenkins, individual stories from Americans across the country who are struggling to pay for their prescription drugs, a poll of viewers about their concerns about buying their drugs and AARP research on rapidly rising prescription prices. . People watching the event were asked if they were concerned about the high cost of prescription drugs and 99% said they were.

At the hearing, Ruderman, 75, who lives in New York, explained that her Social Security benefits and modest pension were not enough to pay for the medications she needed to treat her high cholesterol and osteoporosis. .

“My doctor has repeatedly prescribed me medication, and then I go to the pharmacy and have to turn it down because of the cost it would cost me,” Ruderman says. “Congress needs to bring relief to this madness now.”

Coe’s wife, Lisa, takes 12 prescriptions and the couple spends about $900 a month on those drugs. The biggest cost is insulin, which they ration. “Although Lisa’s doctor has repeatedly told us that this rationing is detrimental to her health, we simply have no choice,” Coe said in her prepared remarks, read by a staff member from the office of the Office. AARP in Arizona. “We regularly have to choose between paying for his medicine or paying for other daily expenses. We are struggling financially and emotionally, and it seems like no one cares.

Dena Bunis covers Medicare, health care, health policy and Congress. She also writes the “Medicare Made Easy” column for the AARP Newsletter. An award-winning journalist, Bunis has spent decades working for metropolitan dailies, including as Washington bureau chief for the Orange County Registry and as a health and workplace policy maker for press day.

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